Our Mythical Childhood–Education…Children’s and Young Adults’ Education Inspired by Classical Antiquity

We’re all working hard, in the Our Mythical Childhood project–and none more so than the team from Bar-Ilan University, in Israel. Lisa Maurice and Ayelet Peer have been developing the Our Mythical Childhood Education survey. It’s a gorgeous site, where they survey a host of educational resources in the teaching of Classical mythology. From textbooks to AV material, worksheets, blogs, exam material, websites, quizzes, lesson plans, syllabi, and the always intriguing category ‘Other,’ this database provides useful and fascinating information for teachers, students, parents, and scholars.

There are currently 100+ items in the survey, and I encourage you to look around.

http://www.omc.obta.al.uw.edu.pl/education-survey

Isn’t it attractive! I encourage you to look around!

Before you do (or after you have done!), I also encourage you to read Lisa Maurice’s thoughts about the OME project–I’ve interviewed her below…

Children’s and Young Adults’ Education
Inspired by Classical Antiquity–interview with Lisa Maurice.

Lisa Maurice is Associate Professor in Classical Studies at Bar-Ilan University, in Israel. She’s published a host of scholarly work, including The Teacher in Ancient Rome (Lexington, 2013), and Screening Divinity
(Edinburgh University Press, June 2019),. She’s also the editor of three volumes in the Brill Metaforms series on the reception of the ancient world in popular culture: The Reception of Ancient Greece and Rome in Children’s Literature: Heroes and Eagles (Brill, 2015); Rewriting the Ancient World: Greeks, Romans, Jews and Christians in Modern Popular Fiction (Brill, 2017), and The Reception of Ancient Virtues and Vices in Modern Popular Culture (Brill, 2017). Shortly, her new edited collection Our Mythical Education, will be published through the Our Mythical Childhood project.

Thanks for taking my questions, Lisa! I’d like to start by asking you what inspired you to develope Our Mythical Education (OME)?

As you know, OME is part of the wider project, OMC, which aims at developing a pioneering approach to the reception of Classical Antiquity in children’s and young adults’ contemporary culture.   Myth is often the first meeting point that a child has with the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome and it is found in a huge variety of educational systems worldwide. 

Most studies or research into how the ancient world is taught focus almost exclusively on the study of the classical languages, which are often thought of as ‘real classics’.  Yet the powerful and gripping stories of classical mythology, which continue to fascinate in myriad cultures and over varied societies, have been frequently been used in fact as vehicles through which to teach or improve other skills, such as literacy, or put across ideological messages.  I go into this further, and many examples of it can be seen, in my forthcoming edited book, Our Mythical Education,which is (very excitingly!) now in the print layout stage at Warsaw University Press, and should be published in the coming months.  So, despite the fact that that little attention has really been paid to it in educational research, the belief that classical myth has played a fundamental role in so many societies and school systems was the initial inspiration behind the overall OME project.  Likewise, the desire to collect, examine and share the amazing materials I was sure existed, and were being used in a range of creative and effective ways, was a main impetus behind the creation of the database.

What do you hope that OME will achieve?

I hope that it will demonstrate just how central Classical myth has been in education, in so many places, and also how versatile a tool it is educationally speaking.  The tales continue to captivate children and youth (and adults!), but they are far more than just ‘stories’, and the complexity of ideas and emotions buried within the narratives have such potential; they are like a fuel source that can still be tapped in so many ways.  I hope that OME will help this potential be realised and will lead to the dissemination and expansion of existing resources.   And particularly, now that so many people are looking for online materials to use in teaching thanks to Covid-19, that they will use the database, and add to it as much as possible.

What sort of material are you looking for/choosing to write about?

We are interested in anything that uses Classical myth, in its broadest sense, within an educational context and framework – we have worksheets, textbooks, audio-visual sources, quizzes and exams, lesson plans, syllabi, blogs, websites, games, comics and more.  This includes materials used in the teaching of Latin and ancient Greek, and in subjects like social studies, history, literature, art, drama etc., and in multiple languages  The possibilities are very wide-ranging!

Can you tell us about some particularly interesting or inspiring items from the OME survey?

I think the sheer breadth of items is what inspires me most.  For example we have workplans and powerpoints from our project working with autistic children here in Israel run by Ayelet Peer under the auspices of our ACCLAIM network (see Susan Deacy’s blogpost on this ). This is an amazing venture, which uses the classical myths to help the students understand and cope with complex emotions, and demonstrates the creative ways in which mythology can be used in education. 

In a different vein, I love movies, and particularly Disney’s Hercules, so I have a soft spot for resources that work with this, like the unit curriculum which describes the 12 labours of Hercules and includes discussion prompts about the myth and how it compares to Hercules in popular culture, specifically the Disney movie.  And now that a remake of this film is happening, I am very curious to see what new resources will be developed when it comes out! 

Magda van Tillburg’s ancient mythis in comic book form…

Finally as a teacher of ancient languages, the comic books by Magda van Tilburg are fabulous – they were new to me, but they present ancient myths in the original languages, along with English translation, in comic book format.  There’s Circe (http://www.omc.obta.al.uw.edu.pl/education-survey/item/64), Dido and Aeneas (http://www.omc.obta.al.uw.edu.pl/education-survey/item/59), Ares and Aphrodite (http://www.omc.obta.al.uw.edu.pl/education-survey/item/63) and Phaethon (http://www.omc.obta.al.uw.edu.pl/education-survey/item/61), as well as a few more we haven’t yet added.  They are free and available online – what an amazing resource, and one I will definitely be using with my own Latin students.

How can people be in touch with submissions or items?

I thought you’d never ask!  You can contact my wonderful colleague Ayelet Peer on ayelet.peer@biu.ac.il and she will send you the short form to fill out and answer any of your questions.  Or email me on lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il. We are ready and waiting eagerly to hear from you!

Thanks! I’m off to consult the survey now–especially to find out more about the comics! — Liz Hale

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